stove for sale 35

Useful Information

Circa: 1880 - 1920
Fuel: Wood and Coal
Burn Time: 6 - 12 Hours
Price Range: $2850 - $4850.00
Gas & Electric Conversions Available On All Models

The Pot belly stove is an American classic heating railroad depots and cabooses. The pot belly stove accompanied many American pioneers as they traversed this country for the first time by locomotive. These portly heaters found a second home in public buildings ad gathering places establishing these barrel stoves as the center piece of social activity in schools, in churches, town halls and meeting houses. And of course, the local general store. Named for its bulging center, the potbelly burns wood or coal. Coming in a variety of sizes, they can heat from 2-5 rooms when fully loaded. A ribbed body augments the total heat output through increasing the surfaces area from which heat escapes. The pot belly stove is among the sturdiest ever constructed and will forever hold a unique place in America's past. They are made in many sizes and many shapes to heat many different areas. 

Potbelly Stoves - A Few Things You Should Know about Pot Belly Stoves

Potbelly Stoves - Pin Up Art

Potbelly Stoves - Railroads & Train Stations

Potbelly Stoves - Sears & Roebuck's Acme Potbelly Stove

Large Monica #20 Wood and Coal Pot Belly Antique Stove - PB1519

   

 

Railway King #14 Wood and Coal Antique Potbelly Stove - PB141015-9

 

Red Cloud D18 Wood and Coal Antique Pot Belly Stove - PB130511-2

 

 

Monarch #13 Potbelly Wood and Coal Antique Stove: PB130511-3

 

Small Atlanta Wood and Coal Antique Potbelly Stove - PB1539

 

Sears Roebuck Wood and Coal Pot Belly Antique Stove - PB1629

The Pot belly stove is an American classic heating railroad depots and cabooses. The pot belly stove accompanied many American pioneers as they traversed this country for the first time by locomotive.

These portly heaters found a second home in public buildings ad gathering places establishing these barrel stoves as the center piece of social activity in schools, in churches, town halls and meeting houses. And of course, the local general store.

Named for its bulging center, the potbelly burns wood or coal. Coming in a variety of sizes, they can heat from 2-5 rooms when fully loaded. A ribbed body augments the total heat output through increasing the surfaces area from which heat escapes. The pot belly stove is among the sturdiest ever constructed and will forever hold a unique place in America's past.

Potbelly stoves were often used in railroads and on railroad cars. When they were used they, they had a lot of safety features including skirts to prevent people from bumping into the stove and hurting themselves. It has a large mushroom lid you could use to cook on and it has a raised lip so nothing could spill off. Sometimes they had poles that went straight down to the ground so that you could actually attach it to the floor of the train car so that it could not tip over at all. Often times the draft controls locked so that only the conductor could adjust the heat and temperature within the railroad car itself. Potbellies are really terrific heaters!